Cambridge and York

Our third day of touring England led us to the University of Cambridge, the second oldest university in the United Kingdom. As we walked through the cobblestone streets of this campus, it was fun imagining Queen Elizabeth II sitting in a classroom, studying in the library or walking these same streets as the church bells rang overhead.

King's College Chapel
King’s College Chapel

We heard these bells ringing several times as we walked through the Sunday market.

Cambridge Market
Cambridge Market

We enjoyed our shopping. I purchased a sweatshirt and a Polish pottery piece for myself and a few other gifts that are surprises for folks I’ve not seen yet. Shhh.

Center of Cambridge Square
Center of Cambridge Square
Gorgeous Campus
Gorgeous Campus

 

The Timeeater
The Timeeater at Corpus Christi College at Cambridge University

I wish I could have gotten a better photo of this time piece. It describes perfectly how I feel about time.  It is being eaten up just like a locust eats up the vegetation of our fields. A perfect example is how long I looked forward to this trip and now it’s over.

As we left the grasshopper chomping away at time, we had a traffic diversion due to a truck fire on the highway we had planned to take. Our detour led us through the legendary Sherwood Forest. There is still one remaining tree from the forest, but no definitive answer as to the true identity of Robin Hood.

Once we’d driven through the “forest”, and arrived at our next destination, we had about 2 hours to tour the city of York.

York City Wall
York City Wall

This was the closest thing to a medieval town that we saw.  Some of the wall dates back to Roman Empire days.

Narrow Streets of York
Narrow Streets of York

Several of the streets were already decorated for Christmas. If you look above the street lamp, you’ll see a small Christmas tree that looks like it’s growing out of the building. There were several of these scattered throughout the village.

Architectural archway.
Architectural archway.
Bridge into York
Bridge into York
The River Ouse
The River Ouse

 

Minster of York
Minster of York
Minster of York Nave
Minster of York Nave
Stained Glass Windows of York Minster
Stained Glass Windows of York Minster

 

City Street and signs.
City Street and signs. 

It was especially touching to find this Remembrance Day Ceremony awaiting us as we returned to the bus. It was led by a moment of silence and then trumpeters played as poppy wreaths were displayed in honor of fallen or serving soldiers.

After loading the bus, we made a stop at a Moto (a motorway service center) on the way to the hotel. As we departed the bus, Paul was being his usual helpful self, assisting ladies and gents down steps and picking up dropped items. One of our fellow travelers told him, “Paul, you are about as helpful as a pocket on a shirt.” Of course, being southern, we all loved this metaphor and it quickly became a motto for the day.

The day came to a close with a delicious dinner at the Marriott Hotel, followed by a Pinot & PJ Party in Charlotte’s room, aptly named by Trudy. Every day was special and while this one began on the second oldest campus in England, it sure ended on a youthful note. I can’t remember the last PJ Party I attended.

5 thoughts on “Cambridge and York

  1. Beautiful pictures! I love looking at all the architecture and seeing Minster of York. Looks like they were selling home bake goods at that market you visited.

  2. I would love to live there. Love the architecture and streets. Our world seems to grow colder and more impersonal every day, and it may be the same way there, but the villages seem to have a warmth that we lack. Your pictures are great.

    1. I loved everything about this country. They talked quite a bit about chivalry and Scottish manners. I would move there just for that, if I could.

  3. With your great photos, you managed to reveal how quaint and picturesqe the towns of Cambridge & York were. Walking their streets was almost like going back in time and both hold so much history. Thank you, again.

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